Low Carb Diet / Keto Diet?

Low Carb Diet / Keto Diet?

Low carb diets have become increasingly popular with Ketogenic Diets, in particular being the biggest buzz word in the diet industry!

But what exactly defines low carb? Does eating this way actually help with weight loss? Are there any other health benefits (or risks) to eating fewer carbs?

Let’s see.

What is a carb?

A carb, or carbohydrate, is one of our three main macronutrients. Carbs, along with protein and fat that are needed for optimal health in quantities larger than vitamins and minerals which are micronutrients.

Carbohydrates come in three main types:
● Sugars
● Starches
● Fibre

Sugars are the smallest (molecule) carb. There are many different kinds of sugars, beyond the well-known table sugar (sucrose) or fruit sugar (fructose).

Starches are longer chains of many sugars bound together. Starches are broken down by our digestive enzymes into sugars. These sugars are then absorbed and metabolised in much the same way as if we ate sugar itself.

Fibre, on the other hand, is also a long chain of sugars, but these are not broken down by our digestive enzymes. Fibre passes through our system, feeds our friendly gut bacteria, and then takes food waste out the other end.

Because fibre isn’t digested like sugars and starches, it’s often excluded from the carb calculation.

How we metabolise carbs

When we eat carbs, our body absorbs the broken-down sugar into our blood, thus raising our blood sugar. Depending on how high and fast our blood sugar rises, our body may release insulin to tell our cells to absorb that sugar out of our blood and use it as energy now or store it for later.

This is part of the theory as to why eating low carb diets may help with weight loss – by preventing the release of insulin, thus preventing the storage of excess calories.

But our bodies are a bit more complicated than that!

Low carb for weight loss?

A few studies recently put low carb diets head-to-head against low-fat diets for weight loss.

Guess what they found?

1 – There isn’t one universal definition of low carb (see the next section below).
2 – It’s more difficult for people to stick to low carb diets than low-fat diets.
3 – Both diets work for some people, and neither one is overwhelmingly better for weight loss than the other.
4 – The number of calories people eat is still considered a huge factor when it comes to weight loss success – more than whether the calories are from carbs or fat.

How many carbs is low carb?

There isn’t one single definition.

The average person eats about 300g of carbs per day. Some people consider eating under 250g of carbs per day to be the first threshold of a low carb diet. That’s really not that low in carbs, it’s lower carb, rather than low carb. Plus, if you’re new to cutting carbs, this level is easy to maintain and a good start (if you want to cut your carbs).

Taking that a step further, eating less than 150 g per day of carbs is considered a typical low carb diet.

On the extreme side, eating less than 50g of carbs per day is considered to be very low carb – it falls under the ketogenic diet range. Eating so few carbs can actually change your metabolism into a ketogenic state. Eating this way can be difficult for many people to maintain.

Other health benefits of low carb diets

Low carb diets have the benefit of preserving muscle mass during weight loss. They can also improve heart health biomarkers like cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

Not to mention that eating fewer carbs can improve how our bodies manage those carbs in terms of insulin and fasting blood sugar levels.

There can definitely be some non-weight-loss health benefits to eating fewer carbs!

Conclusion

Eating a low carb diet can be healthy, as long as it contains enough of all the essential nutrients. Some people may lose weight eating fewer carbs, and others won’t. Do not completely exclude all carbs without the advice of a medical practitioner.

Low carb diets can help to improve how the body manages blood lipids and blood sugar, so it can be a healthy choice for some people.

If weight loss is your main goal, I have written a plan specifically for you. The carbs are low, but the nutrients are high and the food groups are in balance.

Find out more HERE.

As with most things in nutrition, there isn’t a one size fits all rule. If you have tried every diet or health plan and nothing is working for you, then consider a one to one appointment. I will then be able to personalise a plan for you that takes in to account your symptoms, goals and lifestyle.

What about you – have you tried (or do you currently) eat low carb? How many carbs do you eat per day? Have you had any great (or not so great) health effects from it? Let me know in the comments below.

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2 Comments

  1. Fiona on June 7, 2019 at 8:59 pm

    I lost a stone following the keto diet. This took a total of 9 weeks. It was tough, boring and in the end most of the food I ate made me feel queasy. I am now following a Joe Wicks plan to ease myself back into eating more carbs slowly and in conjunction with HIIT exercises, which are tough considering I’ve not exercised since before falling pregnant 2 years ago. However I will stick to it as I’m a 4lbs from my goal.

    • Julie on July 9, 2019 at 11:22 am

      Good luck Fiona 🙂

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